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Meherrin Regional Library System is seeking a Public Services Librarian for the W. E. Richardson, Jr. Memorial Library, Emporia, VA. For details visit the Employment page at www.meherrinlib.org.

Candidates interested in attending should email news@emporianews.com if they do not receive a message from me. Campaigning (within reason) will be allowed before and after the event. Given the number of candidates, however, tables and chairs will not be allowed in the lobby.

Citizens may email their questions for their candidates to news@emporianews.com. The candidates for this year's forum are (in State Board of Elections order NOT Ballot Order):

 

Clerk of the Circuit Court

  • George E. Morrison, III
  • Joann Conner
  • Linda Edwards

 

 
Greensville County Sheriff
  • Stephen King
  • W. T "Tim" Jarratt

 

Member, Board of Supervisors, Zion
  • Belinda D. Astrop
  • Raymond L. Bryant, Jr.
     
Member, Board of Supervisors, Hicksford
 
  • James R. Brown
  • Michael W. Ferguson
Member, Board of Supervisors, Belfield
  • William B. "Bill" Cain
  • Jacqueline Jordan (Running as a Write-in)  
Member, Greensville County School Board, Nottoway
  • Drexel W. Pierce, Jr.
  • Alexis E. Jones

All candidates running in uncontested races will be given time at the end of the forum to intriduce themselves.

Date in pending upon approval of the Greensville County School Board.

As Election Nears, Democrats Haul in the Cash -- Republicans Aren’t Daunted

 

By M. Quesada, Capital News Service

RICHMOND, Va. -- In competitive General Assembly races, a majority of Democratic challengers and incumbents are outraising their opponents and hoping dollars convert to voters on Election Day.

Stakes are high with all 140 General Assembly seats up for re-election on Nov. 5 and a push to flip both chambers to a Democratic majority. A win for Democrats would mean the party  leads both the executive and legislative branches and could be better positioned to pass legislative agendas. 

Democrats raised $13.7 million total to Republicans $8.1 million total in five key Senate races and 26 in the House of Delegates determined by a CNS analysis of competitive races, redistricting changes and recent voting trends on Virginia Public Access Project.

In competitive House races, six Democratic challengers outraised Republican incumbents in the past three months, based on new data released by VPAP. Only three Republican incumbents held a fundraising edge over Democratic challengers -- Del. Nick Freitas, R-Culpeper, Del. Tim Hugo, R-Fairfax, and Del. Christopher Stolle, R-Virginia Beach. Freitas did not register in time to have his name on the ballot, but pledged in August to mount a write-in campaign that could translate to a win in the Culpeper Republican stronghold.

Democratic challenger Sheila Bynum-Coleman outraised Speaker of the House Del. Kirk Cox, R-Colonial Heights, by over $200,000 during the same period. Independent candidate Linnard Harris Sr. raised $2,167.

On the other side, with 11 Democratic incumbents seeking reelection, only two Republican challengers outraised their contenders. Ian Lovejoy is vying for Democratic Del. Lee Carter’s House District 50 seat. Lovejoy outraised Carter by over $70,000. Challenger H. Otto Wachsmann Jr. outraised Del. Roslyn Tyler, D-Sussex, in the race for the seat of House District 75.

Carter said he wasn’t surprised, or unsettled, by his opponent’s cash advantage, "given the fact that Virginia has no limits on corporate contributions.” 

“In fact, I've been continually surprised by how weak his fundraising has been compared to other Republicans in the area, and the fact that the overwhelming majority of his money ... comes from the Republican Party or other Republican campaigns,” Carter said. “I've never taken a single dime from for-profit corporations or industry interest groups, and I never will.  That grassroots support is certainly reflected in our conversations with voters, and I'm very confident that I'll be able to win despite being outspent, just like I did in 2017."

A U.S. Supreme Court decision upheld a redistricting map that favored Democrats and also left six Republicans in Democratic-leaning districts. Some Republican strongholds also began to fade blue when Donald Trump ran against Hillary Clinton, and in recent House and U.S. Senate elections.

There are five battleground races in the Senate, based on VPAP data. In Districts 10 and 12, Democratic challengers have outraised Republican incumbents.

 

Del. Debra Rodman, D-Henrico, raised over $1.4 million in the last two filing periods. She outraised her opponent, incumbent Sen. Siobhan Dunnavant, R-Henrico, whose cash haul was $694,844 in the same period. The two candidates were the first to spend over $1 million in media ad-buys. District 10 challenger Ghazala Hashmi outraised first-term incumbent Sen. Glen Sturtevant, R-Richmond, by $487,951.

Sen. Lynwood Lewis, D-Accomack, the only Democratic incumbent in this group, holds an advantage of nearly $20,000 over his Republican challenger Elizabeth Lankford.

Republican Jen Kiggans and Democrat Cheryl Turpin are vying for the seat vacated by Sen. Frank Wagner, R-Virginia Beach. Turpin raised over $890,000 and Kiggans brought in just over $600,000.

Democratic candidates in these competitive Senate races accumulated just over $4.1 million in three months, compared to the $2.1 million raised by Republican candidates, according to campaign finance reports collected by VPAP.

Jeff Ryer, press secretary for the Virginia Senate Republican Caucus, said the party has faced similar situations before. 

“Hillary Clinton outspent Donald Trump ... and yet Donald Trump was able to prevail,” he said. Ryer said the candidates’ message during an election is more important than money. “Every indication that we have is that most of the races are very close and that both State Senate and State House could go either way.”

Democrats see the uptick in fundraising as proof of the momentum they are gaining in Virginia. The party has also had a higher number of candidates run in the past two elections -- more than double the number in 2015.

“In 2017 Virginia really started a ‘blue wave,’ following Trump’s election,” said Kathryn Gilley, director of communications for the Virginia House Democrats. Gilley believes out-of-state money and interest is important for the future of Virginia. “People see that there is a possibility of flipping the chambers this year,” she said.

Across the state, Democrats have raised large amounts of cash in the past three months, even in districts that lean heavily Republican and don’t offer great odds of victory, in part due to a flood of donations Gilley referenced. But there are opportunities based on climbing voter turnout in off-year elections; heightened by the increasing popularity of absentee ballots. Still, the last time all seats were up for grabs in 2015, only 29% of registered voters turned up. 

“There is greater enthusiasm, right now, among Democratic-inclined voters than Republican-inclined voters,” said Quentin Kidd, director of the Judy Ford Wason Center for Public Policy at Christopher Newport University. “The candidates that are better funded at this point have a better chance in using that money to turn out voters on election day.”

Kidd said out-of-state donations represent the attention these elections have around the country. “People are looking at Virginia as a bellwether to see where voters are and then look forward to next year in the presidential race,” he said.

Key races are identified in this story from VPAP’s competitive index of House and Senate races and also include districts that lean Democratic after House redistricting. Races with an Independent candidate were not included.

“A Real Change”

Years back I fixed the broken
or let’s just say I tried
now days it doesn’t make much sense
to all I must confide.
 
You pay for parts or service
which both are now too high
for less than the cost of repairing
you can another buy.
 
They have the warranties figured out
almost unto the day
so to get extended coverage
is a wasted fee to pay.
 
What do we do with all the extra parts
this system does create
we fill up the junkyards and landfills
and they raise your garbage rate.
 
Parts stores will go out of business
for no longer is the need
yes our high tech technology
means more than what you read.
 
So now when something breaks down
I look for a place to throw
for I can buy another cheaper
than to fix it, don’t you know!
 
                         - Roy E. Schepp

Spotlight on Jobs by the Virginia Employment Commission

 

 

 

The Job Assistant Center in partnership with the Emporia Department of Social Services and the Virginia Employment Commission are sponsoring a Regional Job Fair. The Job Fair is free to the public and will be held at the Golden Leaf Commons, 1300 Greensville County Circle, Emporia, Virginia between 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on October 23, 2019.

Transportation Driver:  Part-time driver to transport persons to medical appointments, deliver meals, care & routine maintenance on vehicles assigned and other transportation related duties. Valid driver's license, good driving record, ability to lift and good physical condition are essential.  Job Order #1806515

Hostess:  Welcome patrons, seat them at tables or in lounge, and help ensure quality of service. High School Diploma or GED preferred but not required. Experience preferred.  Job Order #1782716

Weatherization Installer:  Applies insulation materials such as vapor barriers, loose, blanket, board, and foam insulation to attics, crawl spaces, basements, or walls. Installs/seals air ducts, combustion air openings, or ventilation openings to improve heating and cooling efficiency. Repairs and seals roofs of manufactured homes. Prepares and applies weather-stripping, glazing, caulking, or door sweeps to reduce heating and cooling costs. Wraps air ducts with insulating materials, such as duct wrap and pipe insulation. Wraps water lines and water heaters with insulating materials. Performs minor and incidental structural repairs using basic hand or power tools and materials, such as glass, lumber, and drywall. Installs energy efficient light bulbs, smoke alarms, and carbon monoxide detectors.  Job Order #1767653

Server/Waiter/Waitresses:  Will serve guests, roll silverware, clean and maintain work areas and work as a team member. Expected to provide excellent customer service and abide by company policies and procedures in providing guest services. Must have good communication skills. Will take orders, explain menu and menu items to quests, service customers in a timely manner. Will maintain health standards in food service delivery. Experience preferred but not required.  Job Order #1764345

Licensed Practical Nurse:  Keeps administrative nursing staff informed on personnel development. Provides feedback to Nurse Managers regarding performance of nursing assistance. Serves in and participates in committees as assigned. Ability to address service concerns and follow up timely for resolution. Ability to perform other duties as assigned. Will support all efforts through our Service Excellence Initiative.  Job Order #1762157

THESE AND ALL JOBS WITH THE VIRGINIA EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION CAN BE FOUND ONLINE AT

www.vawc.virginia.gov

The Virginia Employment Commission is An Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

La Comision de Empleo de Virginia es un empleador/programa con igualdad de portunidades.  Los auxiliaries y servicios estan disponibles a dedido para personas con discapacidades

GCPS to Sponsor At-Risk Afterschool Meals

Greensville County Public Schools announces the sponsorship of the At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program. The same meals will be available at no separate charge to all participants at each site.

The Child and Adult Care Food Program is a federally funded, State-administered program that provides funding to child and adult care centers and homes that serve healthy meals and snacks. Through the At-Risk Afterschool Meals component of CACFP, healthy meals and snacks can be served to children and teenagers who participate in afterschool programs in low income areas. To participate, these programs must (1) be organized primarily to provide care for children after school or on the weekends, holidays, or breaks during the regular school year; (2) provide organized, regularly scheduled activities; (3) include educational or enrichment activities, like arts and crafts, computer lessons, or homework help; and (4) be located in an eligible area.

Greensville County Public Schools is proud to participate in the At-Risk Afterschool Meals through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).  We believe that afterschool snacks and meals are an effective way to help reduce childhood hunger when school is out and they help to promote a healthy childhood weight. 

The supper meal consist of a meat/meat alternate, vegetable, grain, fruit, and milk; students must choose 3 of the 5 components offered to make a meal. Most of our snacks consists of a whole grain rich product and a 100% fruit juice option or milk.

"I am happy to be able to fill the hunger gap while our students participate in constructive after school activities that are safe, fun, and filled with opportunities for learning," stated MaRendia Garner, Food Service Supervisor.

Meals will be provided at these facilities:

Greensville County High School

snack & supper

403 Harding Street
Emporia, VA 23847  

Belfield Elementary

snack

515 Belfield Road
Emporia, VA 23847

E. W. Wyatt Middle School

snack

206 Slagles Lake Road
Emporia, VA 23847    

Greensville Elementary

snack

1011 Sussex Drive
Emporia, VA 23847

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form (AD-3027), found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992.

Submit your completed for or letter to USDA by:

(1) Mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

Washington, D.C. 20250-9410

(2) Fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3) Email: program.intake@usda.gov

This institution is an equal opportunity provided.

For further information please contact: MaRendia Garner, Food Service Supervisor at 434-634-2863.

For additional information, you may also contact the Virginia Department of Education, Office of School Nutrition Programs by calling 804-225-2082.

Brunswick Counry High Speed Chase Ends in Fatality

Virginia State Police was called to investigate a single vehicle accident that was a result of a vehicle pursuit by Brunswick County Sheriff's Office.
 
Preliminary investigations reveal that at approximately 10:48 p.m. yesterday evening (October19), the Brunswick County Sheriff's Department attempted to pull over a 2010 Honda Civic for speeding 84MPH in a 70 MPH speed zone. The Honda Civic was traveling in the northbound lanes of Interstate 85, when the deputy attempted to pull over Valeton Junior Pratt. Mr. Pratt failed to pull over and a pursuit entailed. Mr. Pratt attempted to take exit 34 at a high rate of speed, crossed over Route 630, and struck a tree.
 
Mr. Valeton J. Pratt, 27 YOA, of the 1000 block of First Avenue, Lawrenceville, VA., died upon impact. His front seat passenger, Keith M. Haskins, of South Hill, Virginia, suffered non-life threatening injuries, and was taken to VCU Hospital in South Hill, Virginia.
 
Mr. Pratt was not wearing his seat belt at the time of the accident. It is unknown at this time if alcohol played a contributing factor. 
 
Notification to family members has been made.

Bobbie D. Barnes

February 27, 1944 - October 17, 2019

Visitation Services

Saturday, October 19, 2019, from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.

Echols Funeral Home
806 Brunswick Avenue
Emporia, Virginia

Sunday, October 20, 2019, at 3:00 P.M.

Echols Funeral Home
806 Brunswick Avenue
Emporia, Virginia

Bobbie D. Barnes 75, went to be with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, on Thursday, October 17th, 2019. Bobbie was a member of The Trinity Church in Halifax N.C.

She was born in Greensville County, Virginia, the daughter of the late Randall D. Turner and Katie Mathews Turner. She was the widow of David Lee Barnes and also preceded in death by a sister Lucille T. Link Turner and a brother Louis E. “Joe” Turner.

She is survived by her loving and devoted daughter, Patti Lynn Barnes and special friend Stella Stanley and her daughter Morgan of Emporia, VA., a sister, Diane T. Huskey (Jimmy) of Emporia, VA., three brothers, Cleveland D. Turner (Betty) of Norfolk, VA., Bernard Turner (Bertha Ray) of Skippers, VA., R. Jimmy Turner (Marty) of Skippers, VA., numerous nieces and nephews, along with grand dogs Carmel and Bizzie.

A funeral service will be held at Echols Funeral Home on Sunday, October 20, 2019, at 3:00 P.M., with Pastor Mitchell Norville officiating. The family will receive friends Saturday, October 19, 2019, at Echols Funeral Home from 6:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.

Special thanks to the staff of Greensville Manor for their devoted and dedicated care.

Online condolences may be made to www.echolsfuneralhome.com

‘No pedestals, no weapons, no horses,’ -- Women’s Monument Unveiled on Capitol Square

By Susan Shibut, Capital News Service

RICHMOND -- Hundreds watched as the first seven statues of “Voices from the Garden: The Virginia Women’s Monument” were unveiled on the Capitol grounds this morning, on Indigenous Peoples Day. 

The monument is the nation’s first created to showcase remarkable women of Virginia.

Mary Margaret Whipple, vice chair of the Women’s Monument Commission, said the monument embodies the goals of the commission to honor real women in a way that is not mythic or symbolic. The Virginia General Assembly established the commission to determine and recommend an appropriate women’s monument for Capitol Square in 2010. 

“These women rose to the occasion and made significant achievements,” Whipple said. “They were from all walks of life. From different times and places. They were famous and obscure. Real women. Even imperfect women. Who have shaped the history of this commonwealth.” 

Clerk of the Senate Susan Clarke Schaar spoke about the decade-long process for the design and realization of the monument. She worked with professors and historians to design the structure. 

“No pedestals, no weapons, no horses,” Schaar said. “They wanted it to be approachable. They wanted it to be warm and welcoming. And they wanted to convey a sense of consensus building. And they wanted young women and young men to know that they could do anything they wanted to do with their lives.”

Gov. Ralph Northam said the monument is long overdue. 

“For far too long we have overlooked the transformative contributions of women and other underrepresented groups,” said Northam. “Until recently that has been the case on Capitol Square as well.”

Capitol Square is also home to the Virginia Civil Rights Memorial, opened in 2008, and “Mantle,” a monument dedicated to Virginia’s Indian tribes in 2018. 

Artist Kehinde Wiley last month in Times Square unveiled “Rumors of War,” a statue of a young African American man on a horse in a pose modeled after Confederate monuments. The statue will be permanently moved to the entrance of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts on Arthur Ashe Boulevard in December.

2019 is the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in America. It also marks the 400th anniversary of the first slaves arriving in Virginia. 

Sen. Ryan McDougle, a Republican running for reelection in the 4th District, brought his daughter Reagan on stage with him. He said the monument was about inspiring the accomplishments of women yet to come. 

“It’s about Reagan, and all the girls here today, and all the girls that will come; whether they have those role models in their families or not, they will be able to see that women that have come before them have achieved tremendous things,” McDougle said.

When the monument is completed it will feature a dozen bronze statues on a granite plaza and an etched glass Wall of Honor inscribed with 230 names of notable Virginian women and room for more. For a future honoree to qualify for the wall, she must be a native Virginian or have lived mostly in Virginia and must be deceased for at least 10 years.

The granite wall features a quote excerpted from a 1912 address that Mary Johnston, a 20th century Virginian author, made to an all-male Richmond conference of state governors:

“It did not come up in a night, the Woman Movement, and it is in no danger of perishing from view. It is here to stay and grow … It is indestructible, it is moving on with an ever- increasing depth and velocity, and it is going to revolutionize the world.”

The seven completed statues are Anne Burras Laydon, a Jamestown colonist; Cockacoeske, Pamunkey chieftain; Mary Draper Ingles, a frontierswoman; Elizabeth Keckly, seamstress and confidante to Mary Todd Lincoln; Laura Copenhaver, an entrepreneur in the textile industry; Virginia Randolph, an educator; and Adèle Clark, suffragist and artist. 

Five more statues will be added as they are funded and completed — Martha Dandridge Custis Washington, America’s inaugural first lady; Clementina Bird Rind, the first female printer in Virginia; Sally Louisa Tompkins, a hospital administrator; Maggie L. Walker, a civil rights leader and entrepreneur; and Sarah G. Boyd Jones, teacher and physician. 

The statues, which each required a $200,000 investment, were sculpted by New York-based Ivan Schwartz, who also crafted the Capitol’s Thomas Jefferson statue.

Schwartz spoke about the lack of statues to, for, or about women. According to the Washington Post, of the estimated 5,193 public statues depicting historic figures on display on street corners and parks throughout the United States, 394 are of women. 

“Women have been excised from the marble pedestal of history,” Schwartz said.

Schwartz has recently worked on other sculptures of notable women around the country. He mentioned projects highlighting Susan B. Anthony, Anne Frank and Harriet Tubman.

“I still make sculptures of Abraham Lincoln and George Washington,” Schwartz said. “I don’t turn my back on these good gentlemen. But their gentlemen’s club, which has occupied our national living room, our nation’s public spaces, has at last started to admit women, African Americans and Native Americans.”

Girl Scouts unveiled the structures, pulling back a blue cloth as the name of each statue was announced by Susan Allen, chair of the Virginia Capitol Foundation and former first lady of Virginia. The Girl Scouts represented councils from the Commonwealth of Virginia, Virginia Skyline and the Colonial Coast. 

Allen gave closing remarks, calling the occasion “a monumental day.”

“Let us recognize our diverse past, and those on whose shoulders we stand so proudly today and be inspired to work on for a better future for our daughters and the young leaders of tomorrow like these lovely young women here today,” Allen said.

Annual Ginger and Turmeric Field Day Focuses on New Varieties and Health Finding

Dr. Reza Rafie holds baby ginger grown at Virginia State University’s Randolph Farm.

Virginia Cooperative Extension will conduct its Ginger and Turmeric Field Day Thursday, October 24, 2019, at Virginia State University (VSU), Petersburg, Va. The popular annual program will cover both the health benefits of ginger and turmeric, as well as techniques to successfully grow and market it. Participants will also visit VSU’s Randolph Farm, where they will see four new varieties of container and outdoor grown ginger, as well as learn about the harvesting, washing and packing of the crops for market. Additionally, participants will learn about the runaway success story of Richmond’s Hardywood Brewery Gingerbread Stout, which features locally-grown ginger.

Pre-registration is required and costs $20 per person. It includes a boxed lunch.

At the program new VSU research will be announced that confirms immature ginger, or “baby” ginger, contains about twice as many polyphenols and has two to three times more antioxidation activity than the mature ginger found in most grocery stores. “That means if you’re eating ginger for its health benefits,” said Dr. Rafat Siddiqui, associate professor of food sciences at VSU’s Agricultural Research Station, “you may be selling yourself short at the supermarket, which traditionally offers only mature ginger, recognizable by its light brown color.”

Unfortunately for consumers though, 100 percent of the ginger found at the supermarket is imported, largely from Southeast Asia on container ships. From the time it’s packed until it makes its way into our kitchens is usually months. “Baby ginger is more perishable than its older counterpart, which naturally features a papery skin to lock in moisture and freshness,” said Dr. Reza Rafie, horticulture Extension specialist at VSU. “The immature ginger just couldn’t make the voyage.”

So, what’s a health-conscious, ginger-lover to do? Rafie and others at the field day will present solutions that not only hold benefits for consumers, but also for U.S. small-scale farmers, as well.

Since it takes less time to grow and harvest baby ginger (seven to eight months, Rafie explained, compared to commercial ginger, which matures in the ground for about 10-11 months), the tropical plant can grow in regions with shorter growing seasons than Southeast Asia. Rafie explained he and many others have had great success growing baby ginger in pots and in raised beds up and down the East Coast.

“But it’s a crop that must be sold close to home and quickly,” he added. “It’s perfect for those small-scale farmers who sell direct to consumers at farmers markets or through community supported agriculture (CSA) programs or to chefs, who prefer it for its more delicate taste and the fact it doesn’t need to be peeled.”

Presenters at the field day will also discuss the potential profitability of growing baby ginger. Immature ginger is selling this fall for about $5 to $10 a pound, depending on the market, remarked Rafie. Compared with traditional small-scale farming crops like tomatoes or sweet potatoes, which were selling this summer at a Richmond, Va farmers market for $2 and $1.50* respectively, baby ginger can offer farmers the opportunity for greater profits per production area.

He explained that production results at VSU have shown that each ginger plant has the potential of producing three to eight pounds of marketable baby ginger, depending on production techniques, including fertilizer, irrigation, disease management and mounding.

“The market potential is considerable,” says Rafie.

The program will be held in the L. Douglas Wilder Building Auditorium, Carter G. Woodson Avenue on the VSU campus.

For more information, visit the VSU Cooperative Extension calendar of events at ext.vsu.edu and click on the event. If you desire further information or are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Mark Klingman at mjklingman@vsu.edu or

804-524-5493/TDD (800) 828-1120 during business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations five days prior to the event.

Gene Seward

March 28, 1949 - October 12, 2019

Visitation Services

1 p.m., Tuesday, October 15

Owen Funeral Home
303 S. Halifax Road
Jarratt, Virginia

2 p.m., Tuesday, October 15

Owen Funeral Home
303 S. Halifax Road
Jarratt, Virginia
 

Gene Seward, 70, of Jarratt, passed away Saturday, October 12, 2019. He was preceded in death by his father, James W. Seward, Sr. and a sister, Arlene Leasburg. He was a retired employee of Greensville Correctional Center and a USMC veteran of the Vietnam War where he earned the Purple Heart.

Gene is survived by his wife, Betty V. Seward; son David Seward (Paula); his mother, Frances Seward; three brothers, James Wilson Seward, Jr. (Diane), Leon Seward (Rita) and Billy Seward (Gail); a number of nieces and nephews and his beloved “grandpuppy” Roscoe.

The funeral service will be held 2 p.m., Tuesday, October 15 at Owen Funeral Home, 303 S. Halifax Rd, Jarratt, Virginia where the family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. Interment will follow at St. John Lutheran Church Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to Jarratt Volunteer Fire Department, P.O. Box 562, Jarratt, Virginia 23867.

Online condolences may be shared with the family at www.owenfh.com.

Elton Alexander Lucy

September 18, 1929 – October 9, 2019

Memorial Service

2:00 p.m. Sunday, October 13, 2019

Pleasant Hill Christian Church
175 Ankum Road
Gasburg, Virginia

Elton Alexander Lucy, age 96, of Lake Gaston-Henrico, N.C. and Emporia, Va., passed away October 9, 2019. The son of Charlie Lear Lucy and Daisy Browder Lucy, Elton was born September 18, 1923 and raised in Lawrenceville, Virginia.  February 11, 1943 he married his high school sweetheart, Lucille Baird Lucy.  They had 65 happy years together until her death in 2008. He was also preceded in death by his parents, his brothers, Joseph Gilbert Lucy and Emory Lear Lucy, and a sister, Phyllis Lucy Daniel.  He is survived by his son, Gerald W. Lucy of Lawrenceville, and his daughter, Glenda Lucy Pope and her husband, Linwood, of Emporia, Va.  He is also survived by his grandchildren, Lin Pope, Charles Pope and his wife, Tina, all of Emporia, Jeremy Lucy and his wife, Angie, of Dolphin, Va., and Daisy Lucy Cary and her husband, Tommy, of Liberty, Texas. Great grandchildren are Emily Pope, Carter Pope, Allie Pope, Charlie Pope, Meredith Lucy, Abbie Grace Lucy, River Lucy, Sadie Cary, and Rock Cary.  He is also survived by a niece, June Lucy Spurlock, of Reno, Nevada and a nephew, Danny Hale Daniel, of Courtland, Va.

Elton worked for the U.S. Postal service from 1961-1985 serving as Assistant Postmaster in Emporia, Va. and as Postmaster in Lawrenceville, Va.  He was a member of Pleasant Hill Christian Church, Gasburg, Va. where he was an Honorary Lifetime Elder, Chairman of the Finance Committee and Treasurer of his Sunday School Class.  During World War II, he served in the Army Transportation Corp aboard the hospital ships USAHA Louis A. Milne and USS Chateau Therry.  

A Memorial Service will be held at 2:00 p.m. Sunday, October 13, 2019 at Pleasant Hill Christian Church, 175 Ankum Road, Gasburg, Va.  There will be a reception following the service in the Family Life Building.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Memorial Fund of Pleasant Hill Christian Church.  Williams Funeral Home, Lawrenceville will be handling the arrangements.    

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